What Content Is and Is Not

In recent posts, I have defined content as a composition, irrespective of format, that moves or guides its audience to feel or act or that adds to or synthesizes a body of knowledge. Content typically carries with it its own context.

As such, content is mostly distinct from raw data and other digitized information that serve only as single reference points or as machine records. Moreover, content has–and can be reused for–an identifiable purpose or reason for existing.

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Content Metrics Revisited

I am rethinking my “categories of metrics” for content strategy and management after attending Joe Gelb’s and Lawrence Orin’s webinar “How to Become a Data-Driven Documentation Team” earlier this month.

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5 Intersects of Content Strategy and Project Management (Part 5)

The easiest thing to say about measuring the success of a content strategy or a project is to say “measure what is meaningful to your organization.” Makes sense; I wouldn’t want to measure what is not meaningful. Turns out, that’s easy to say but difficult to do.

Nevertheless I persisted. <smile> In fact, coming up with a set of content metrics was part of my job as a Content Strategist at Oracle. I learned a lot during that journey and wanted to share a bit of it here. Read more

7 Definitions of Content Strategy (in 16 Years)

As a content strategist, I focus on the internal structures that support and deliver your organization’s key communications. That framework includes a content model, content development processes and governance, content reuse, metadata and SEO, analytics, and other methodologies that enable your content to be effective, efficient, useful, and scalable. Read more